Make the Most of Summer 2020

Make the most of Summer 2020 with classes designed to get you closer to your degree or to move ahead in your studies or career – without leaving home.

Learn from the best – widely respected, expert University of Kentucky College of Education faculty who are committed to your success.


Courses for Many Levels & Interests

Our courses have been designed for:

  • Incoming students to prepare for college learning and get a jump on earning credits at a discounted rate
  • Undergraduate and graduate students who want to get ahead in coursework at a discounted rate
  • Professionals interested in adding skills and certifications/badges to their resumes
  • Non-degree seeking students who want to enhance their knowledge

Explore a sampling of College of Education offerings below. Please note: This is not a complete listing or official course catalog. Some course availability may change. Check with your advisor (to find your advisor, visit: https://education.uky.edu/academics/advising/) or the UK course catalog for a complete listing of courses offered in the college and across the university.


A Variety of Schedules

While the 2020 Summer session begins May 12 and ends August 6, many of the college’s courses do not meet for the full duration of the session. Each course’s start and end dates are listed in the course catalog. Typically, students have until the course’s start date, or soon after, to register. The university is offering a special summer discounted rate for undergrads – $499 per credit hour!


Courses for Incoming Students

A “behind the headlines” look at college life. The class is designed to engage students in an interdisciplinary study of higher education research from the student’s point of view. This is a course about college students for college students that meets UK Core requirements in Foundations of Inquiry in the Social Sciences. Participants will explore the history of student culture, economics, and personal finance issues affecting student access, the exchange value of a degree in today’s society, different approaches to research, how to build successful academic habits, and what it means to be a member of an inclusive campus.
UK Core – Social Sciences

This course is a study of the human body with first aid subject matter, demonstrations, and skill training in the event of sudden illness or injury. The course is delivered in a hybrid manner with the lecture material being taught on-line and first aid skills being taught once a week in face-to-face laboratory session. American Red Cross Certifications for CPR, AED, and Responding to Emergencies First Aid are awarded to those who meet the criteria.

This is a newly approved UK Core class for Social Sciences. We will be delving into the different dimensions of wellness and talking about finding balance. We will also explore so many fun and engaging topics like nutrition, physical fitness, stress management, and sleep health! Learn how you can apply this information to your own health and wellness, but also how you can support your friends and family and others in the community on their own journey.
UK Core – Social Sciences

This course focuses on the interrelationship between nutrition and physical fitness. The intent is to provide the student with the information necessary to formulate an individualized plan for the achievement and maintenance of adequate nutrition and physical fitness. Weight control will be discussed in this content. Team taught by nutrition faculty and health, physical education and recreation faculty. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.


Courses for Current Undergraduate Students

Digital game-based video applications as prominent video-based vehicles for distance education and multimedia development through multi-user and virtual platforms. Classroom exercises and projects develop basic video game production skills including the use of graphical and video assets, flash animations storyboarding, equipment, terminology and systems, message design issues, and research on DGBI.

This course is designed to expand student understanding of the theory and practice of leadership, conflict management, and decision-making. It is also designed to focus on issues of cohesiveness, trust, motivation, vision, and goals. Students must integrate their personal ethics and definition of leadership in various course assignments and projects. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

This course supplements and integrates previous learning and is designed to provide maximum exposure to various concepts and perspectives of leadership through observational experiences, critical thinking, and self-analysis. It is also designed to allow the demonstration of previously learned leadership theories, styles, and strategies. Students must integrate their personal ethics and vision of leadership in their examination of various contemporary leadership contexts. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

This course will be taught in six weeks this summer in an asynchronous on-line format. Dr. Amy Spriggs will cover an introduction to the various contemporary areas of special education. Topics include special education categories, programming, service delivery models, career education, child advocacy, and laws governing public education for students with disabilities. This course is a great elective for many students and can fulfill a requirement for many education majors!

This course will be taught by Dr. Melinda Ault, associate professor in special education. The course is an introduction to the basic principles of applied behavior analysis. If you would like to learn how to individualize learning environments and implement behavior management strategies, this course is for you. The principles of applied behavior analysis apply to all people, so its application is appropriate for those working in education, healthcare, business management, and social work to name a few. It also is appropriate for parents who want to have better behavior management in the home. Prereq: EDS 375 or permission of the instructor.

This course is an introduction to cultural/global competency and perspectives of diverse and underrepresented groups living in Kentucky, the US, and around the world. Through this course, students will build skills and knowledge in preparation for working with diverse groups of people and/or kids in their future careers. Explore multicultural perspectives through a unique and engaging virtual modular format. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better understanding of their own cultural background as well as the backgrounds, challenges, and life experiences of different people they will come into contact with in today’s globalized world. Hybrid format with Zoom meetings on the following Thursdays: 6/25, 7/9, 7/16, 7/30, 8/6
2-4 p.m.

Who should take this class?
-Anyone interested in earning elective credit at the 300+ level.
-Students who had planned to study abroad this summer and want a suitable alternative.
-Anyone planning a future career working with diverse populations.

A survey course in the social science foundation of sport. Study of the sociological and psychological concepts which are relevant in understanding of sport in this country and the world. After the successful completion of this course the student should be able to define, discuss, and identify the basic social and psychological factors which are related to the pursuit of movement through sport. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in some programs

An in-depth study of the immediate and long-term effects of exercise on the human organism. This course is a pre-requisite for those considering the MS in Exercise Physiology. Summer is a great time for those who have been conditionally admitted to complete the course so they can kick off their graduate courses in the fall. Prereq for KHP exercise science majors: ANA 209, PGY 206 or equivalent. Junior, senior or graduate standing. Prereq for KHP Kinesiology and Health Promotion Teacher Cert majors: KHP 205 or equivalent. Junior, senior or graduate standing.

This elective course will explore research findings in the psychology of teaching and coaching with emphasis placed on factors which influence the acquisition of motor skills as well as on the psychological benefits of exercise and sport. Prereq: Undergraduate psychology course and basic statistics or consent of instructor

This course is intended to help future mathematics/science teachers build a theoretical background and gain the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in secondary classrooms.

Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching mathematics/science at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to formulate an understanding of how to integrate the mathematical and scientific practices with the core ideas of the disciplines to develop deep conceptual understanding.

The experiences in this course are designed to prepare teachers who will work among diverse populations and constantly be in tune with best practices and their implementation as a way to improve education in Kentucky and beyond. The course will focus on developing a number of general pedagogical skills; the integration of math and science candidates into this single class will enrich the conversations around such topics.

Prereq: Admission to the TEP and either the B.S. in STEM Education or the M.A.T. in Secondary STEM Education (Initial Certification – Secondary Ed) program.

 


Courses for Graduate/Post-Baccalaureate Students

How do people use literacy in their everyday lives?
What are the implications of real-world literacy skills and practices for families and communities in areas such as:
· Education
· Health
· Finances
· Politics/civic engagement, or
· The digital world?
How can we empower families and communities by supporting development of relevant literacy practices? This course is intended to help graduate students understand literacy as a powerful everyday phenomenon, gain techniques for evaluating literacy in family and community settings, and develop plans for supporting literacy practice in various real-world contexts.

EDC 630 will be offered in the first 6 weeks of Summer 2020 (May 12-June 23). The class will meet synchronously on Tuesday evenings from 4:30-7 p.m. via Zoom, with additional asynchronous work during the week.

This course provides an in-depth study of theories and teaching methods for integrating literacy (including digital literacy) instruction into content area classrooms at the K-12 levels. Instructional strategies, procedures, and assessments designed to increase vocabulary learning and comprehension of expository texts are emphasized. Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor

Digital game-based video applications as prominent video-based vehicles for distance education and multimedia development through multi-user and virtual platforms. Classroom exercises and projects develop basic video game production skills including the use of graphical and video assets, flash animations storyboarding, equipment, terminology and systems, message design issues, and research on DGBI.

Students use instructional computing applications and understand the roles and uses of computers in instruction. Students select and use instructional computing hardware and software appropriate to instructional goals and settings. Students use electronic networks for instructional purposes. Students demonstrate skill using basic productivity software through structured assignments and collaborative projects.

Taught by Curriculum and Instruction Department Chair Jared Stallones, dive into career academies, NTI work, and more

A study of schooling and education using basic analytic paradigms of sociology. Emphasis on schools as formal organizations and education in a changing, technologically oriented and stratified society. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

This course addresses the role of the educational administrator in providing professional development that supports communities of practice and the adoption of contemporary technologies and digital resources to enhance student academic learning. The course introduces students to principles of adult learning that characterize effective professional development and planning as it relates to technology adoption at the school, district and state-levels of education.

This course focuses on educators’ use of technology to support data-driven decision making to support continuous improvement and change at the school, district, and state levels of education. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

This course examines school administrators? social, ethical, and legal issues and responsibilities for all students, including those with disabilities and special needs, for digital citizenship. Facilitating understanding of evolving virtual school environments and modeling digital citizenship at the school, district, and state levels are also addressed. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

Study of legal and ethical issues as related to practical problems of school administration. Constitutional provisions and court decisions are examined as they impact education.

Study of human resources development practices in school systems, with emphases on central office and school unit responsibilities for attracting, selecting, developing, evaluating and retaining competent faculty and staff.

Role of the school district superintendent is studied including: historical and current job responsibilities of the position; knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to serve successfully in the position; future challenges of the position. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

This course focuses on understanding the field of organizational change as well as emphasizing the nature, characteristics, responsibilities, and contextual determinants that influence a leader’s role in changing educational organizations. Prereq: Admission to the program or consent of instructor.

A series of 1-credit courses designed for doctoral students to attain key dissertation writing skills likely not taught anywhere else. Students should enroll in these courses if they are interested in: Sharpening their writing. Improve how their dissertation is framed. Impressing their committee. Becoming a faculty mind-reader.
Sections:

  • Academic Writing EDL 770 Section 210
    This course is for doctoral students who want to developing their analytical and writing skills for the purposes of reading, conducting, and reporting educational research. Topics in this course may include but are not limited to developing quantitative and qualitative research manuscripts, examining historical texts, writing grant proposals, and writing program evaluation reports. An emphasis is placed on the importance of revising works for grammar, audience, outlet, and professional style (e.g., APA).
  • The Literature Review EDL 770 Section 211
    This course is for doctoral students who want strategies for sourcing and writing a literature review. Students will spend time in the seminar advancing their literature review skills including search strategies and documentation, effective use of synthesis and summaries, and building a database to support your review. Theoretical Conceptual Frameworks EDL 770 Section 212 This course is for doctoral students who want to demystify the terms “theoretical framework” and “conceptual framework.” You’ve been told you must have these in your dissertation, but what are they? In this course you’ll learn why theoretical framework is critical in your dissertation, why you’re required to have one, and how to develop one. You’ll also understand how conceptual frameworks help define and bind a study. By the end of the seminar you’ll understand why theory is your friend and how it will help you develop your methods and analyze your data.
  • Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks in the DissertationThis course is for doctoral students in social sciences, humanities, and other disciplines who want to demystify the terms “theoretical framework” and “conceptual framework.” You may have been told you must have these in your dissertation, but what are they? In this course you’ll learn why theoretical framework is critical in your dissertation, why you’re required to have one, and how to develop one. You’ll also understand how conceptual frameworks help define and bind a study. By the end of the seminar you’ll understand why theory is your friend and how it will help you develop your methods and analyze your data.

Prereq: Consent of instructor.

This is offered online in an asynchronous format this summer, May 12-June 23, 2020. This course is offered to graduate and post baccalaureate students who want to learn more about special education and exceptional individuals. It is particularly beneficial for those who will work in schools or will prepare others to work in schools. It is a fast-paced course that covers each of the disability categories and provides an opportunity for scholars to study special education literature.

Kera Ackerman, assistant professor in special education will be teaching EDS 600 this summer. She has extensive experience in P-12 special education classrooms and is excited to share her knowledge with you!

Section 210: Introduction to Action Research for Teachers and School Leaders. In introduction on designing and creating a plan to engage in action research in your school.

Section 211: Introduction to Mixed Methods Action Research.
An introduction to a mixed methods action research framework for advanced masters and doctoral students in social science, education, agriculture, public policy, medicine.

This four-week course is a study of using regression analysis and associated techniques to analyze quantitative data. We will cover topics that include simple linear regression, multiple regression, regression diagnostics, interaction terms, non-linear terms, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and logistic regression. The primary goals in this course are to understand the practical applications of and intuition for using regression analysis. Prerequisite: EPE/EDP 558 or equivalent introductory statistics course.

This course examines major bodies of theory related to college student development and the contexts in which that development occurs. We will explore the history of the field and multiple “waves” of student development scholarship. Using case study analysis and discussion of current student experiences, class members will be asked to interpret and apply theories to understanding students’ development relative to real-world issues in student affairs/higher education practice. The course entails course readings and reflection, participation in online discussions, conducting a literature review, and a group case study project. This summer course is a blend of online discussion and group work, punctuated by a series of synchronous (recorded) webinars with opportunities for interaction. Recommended as core class for MS in Higher Education Student Services track. Note: students taking courses in first four weeks can pace their work to start after June 9th; alternatively, it is possible to complete your work by July 8th. Group work will take place in June.

This course will provide students with an overview of the theory and applications of advanced psychometric methods. It covers topics in the areas of Rasch Modeling, Item Response Theory, Structural Equation Modeling, Advanced Survey Techniques, and Latent Variable Modeling (as well as additional techniques). Given the advanced nature of the course, we will not shy away from using the mathematical tools needed to develop the conceptual understanding. But the emphasis of the course will be on the conceptual understanding and application of the tools rather than on the math or the mechanics behind the tools. This course can be repeated for up to 12 credit hours. Prereq: Intermediate Statistics.

History matters. Use it to explore significant educational issues in EPE 797 this summer. This course is taught by University Research Professor John Thelin. (Read a Q&A from Dr. Thelin here: https://uknow.uky.edu/professional-news/qa-uks-john-thelin-about-covid-19-s-impact-higher-education.) There are no prerequisites for this course.

Learn about current and significant health issues to increase knowledge, skills, and health literacy and keep up with the rapidly changing health world.

Explore contemporary health issues particularly relevant to LGBTQ* populations and how health promotion strategies address some of these health issues.

This course is intended to help future mathematics/science teachers build a theoretical background and gain the practical skills needed to begin to develop themselves as effective teachers in secondary classrooms.

Students will be introduced to, and gain hands-on experience with a variety of instructional materials appropriate for teaching mathematics/science at the secondary level. Students are encouraged to be creative and reflective in developing, implementing, and evaluating practices associated with teaching concepts and skills. A strong emphasis is placed upon helping students to formulate an understanding of how to integrate the mathematical and scientific practices with the core ideas of the disciplines to develop deep conceptual understanding.

The experiences in this course are designed to prepare teachers who will work among diverse populations and constantly be in tune with best practices and their implementation as a way to improve education in Kentucky and beyond. The course will focus on developing a number of general pedagogical skills; the integration of math and science candidates into this single class will enrich the conversations around such topics.

Prereq: Admission to the TEP and either the B.S. in STEM Education or the M.A.T. in Secondary STEM Education (Initial Certification – Secondary Ed) program.