Common Research Methods and Statistics Core (12 hours)

Group A: Quantitative Courses (3-6 hours)

EDP 656: Methodology of Educational Research
An introduction to research methods applicable to education, the scientific method, research designs, measurement techniques, statistical analysis, and writing the research report. Prereq: EDP/EPE 557, EDP/EPE 558, or equivalent, but preferred EDP/EPE 558

 

EDP/EPE 660: Research Design and Analysis in Education
This is a statistics-oriented course that focuses on various aspects of regression analysis (general and generalized linear models). Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, simple correlation and regression, multiple regression (with and without interaction/moderation terms, with/without nonlinear terms, contrast variable coding for categorical predictors, nested model comparison for hierarchical regression, etc.), regression diagnostics (outlying and influential cases identification and assessment, collinearity evaluation, residual analysis, etc.), logistic regression (with a comparison of the logit model with other commonly used classification models like probit model, decision tree model, etc.), among other things. The course will familiarize students with cleaning data for regression analysis, building regression models, conducting statistical inference of regression models, selecting the optimal regression model(s) for the data in hand, and interpreting regression analysis results using the right language. Students will gain requisite foundation knowledge necessary to learn more complex statistical tests and procedures, and become more critical of statistical presentations in academic journals and the mass media. Students will also become proficient in using at least one major statistics computer program (SPSS, Minitab, SAS, Stata, or R). Prereq: EPE/EDP 558 or consent of instructor.

 

EDP/EPE 707: Multivariate Analysis in Educational Research
Multivariate statistics will prepare student to understand multivariate statistical methods and draw the link between statistics previously learned. Students will be able to conduct, interpret, and critique procedures such as factorial ANOVA, multiple regression, MANOVA, ANCOVA, MANCOVA, PCA, EFA, discriminant function analysis, logistic regression, canonical correlation, hierarchal linear regression, and multivariate analysis of change. Become familiar with statistical software for implementing multivariate procedures. Develop an understanding of the concepts, terms, and symbols used in multivariate statistics (e.g., Matrix Algebra, effect sizes). Gain an appreciation of the role of multivariate procedures in the research process. Gain requisite knowledge necessary to learn more complex statistical procedures. Prereq: EDP/EPE 660 or equivalent.
 

EPE 619: Survey Research
Survey research is one of the most common and useful methods for gathering data in educational research. Obtaining valid and reliable research results requires the administration of instruments that provide valid and reliable measures of the variables selected for observation. This course will focus on principles of measurement and procedures for developing a variety of survey instruments and for determining their validity and reliability. It is designed to teach students both how to improve the questions and design instruments. The theory and practice of survey research relies on contributions from disciplines such as psychology, sociology, statistics, and computer science. The purpose of this course is to familiarize participants with basic features of the design and implementation of surveys, and acquaint them with some principles and underlying theory from disciplines that have traditionally used surveys most heavily. The course will cover major stages of the survey process, including hypothesis and problem formulation, study design, sampling, questionnaire design, interviewing techniques, pretesting, modes of data collection, and data cleaning, management, and analysis. The course involves lectures, readings, and discussions. Students are encouraged to bring materials related to their own research interests. The course will provide an overview of the theoretical and experimental literature related to question and questionnaire design as well as focusing on practical issues in the design, critique, and interpretation of survey questions that are often not taught in formal courses. There will be exercises both in and outside of class to reinforce both theory and practice. Prereq: EPE/EDP 557 or an equivalent course; an introductory statistics course.
 

ANT/EDP/EPE 620 or SOC 622: Introduction to Evaluation
An examination of a subset of evaluation methods, topics, and problems. An introductory course in the area with minimal emphasis on quantitative methods. The course is designed to: provide a perspective from which evaluation studies may be viewed; and, to provide experiences for those who will learn from or conduct evaluations. Prereq: Consent of instructor, and a basic course in statistics or research.
 

ANT/EDP/EPE 621: Advanced Methods in Evaluation
An advanced course in evaluation methods and techniques with an emphasis on quantitative methodology. State of the art ideas and methods of conducting evaluation studies and analyzing data from those studies are presented. The course is designed primarily for those who are conducting or will conduct evaluation studies. Prereq: A basic course in statistics or its equivalent; EDP/EPE 620/SOC 622; and consent of instructor.
 

EDP/EPE 679: Introduction to Measurement Theory & Techniques
This is a measurement-oriented course that focuses on introducing measurement theory and techniques used in education and evaluation. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, measurement models, bivariate measures of association, norms, standardized score scales, scaling, reliability, validity, item analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, test construction for affective and cognitive instruments, Item Response Theory, and Rasch. The course aims to familiarize students with measurement terminology, possess a detailed strategy for constructing an instrument suitable for research purposes, become familiar with statistical procedures and software for implementing measurement techniques, gain requisite foundation of knowledge necessary to learn more complex measurement models, and become more critical of measurement presentations in academic journals and the mass media. Prereq: EDP/ EPE 660, EPE 621, or equivalent.
 

Group B: Qualitative Courses (3-6 hours)

EPE 663: Field Studies in Educational Settings
Field research in an educational setting. Questions of theory, method, and application examined. Students plan and implement a study under faculty supervision. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Consent of instructor.
 

EPE 763: Advanced Topics and Methods of Evaluation
This course continues an exploration of qualitative research methods in the study of education. It focuses on advanced data collection techniques and particularly on methods of data analysis, representation and writing. The course revolves around an experiential core of individual student research products. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: EPE 663, other introductory qualitative research methods courses or instructor’s permission.
 

EPE 669: Oral History
This course is an introduction to oral history methodology and theory. It is designed for persons intending to use oral and life history interviews in historical or other qualitative research. The course examines how: oral history projects are initiated, projects are administered, interviews are conducted, and oral history interviews are preserved in archives and libraries. The course also explores the reliability of memory and the utilization of oral histories in public presentations. Readings in the course focus on the development of oral history as a research methodology. Assignments and discussions will provide experience with interviewing, recording and transcribing, editing and publishing oral histories
 

Group C: Advanced Course (3 hours)
Determined by the advisory committee (course needs to be either quantitative or psychometric as approved by the student’s advisory committee)

*Groups A + B must be taken for a combined total of 9 hours with a minimum of 3 hours in each group.

Interdisciplinary Core (6 hours)

EDP 548: Educational Psychology
An introduction to the application of principles of psychology to classroom learning and teaching problems.
 

EDP 600: Human Lifespan Development
A survey of human development across the life span of the individual from conception to death. Content includes changes in motor skills, biological growth and decline, learning behavior, language, social, emotional, moral, and intellectual development as well as the roles of the family, the school, peers, and work in relation to individual development. Critical evaluation of current theories which describe human development.
 

EDP 603: Human Cognitive Development
Theory and research concerning the development of attitudes, motives, self-concept and other cognitive processes are presented and the educational implications explored. Prereq: EDP 548 or EDP 610 or EDP 600.
 

EDP 610: Theories of Learning in Education
Consideration of the theoretical origins of learning within the context of education. Topics include major theories of learning, physiological bases for learning, relationships between learning theory and instruction, and major applications of learning theories in educational settings
 

EDP 614: Motivation and Learning
This course will provide a review of current educational and psychological theories of motivation. After examining various theories (e.g., attributions, goals, self efficacy, expectancy X value), the course will examine applications of these theories to contemporary issues such as violence, substance abuse, dropping out of school, health maintenance, etc.
 

EDP 616: Multicultural Psychology
This course is designed to increase one’s sensitivity to and respect for individual differences. Models, frameworks, techniques and experiential exercises are presented to increase one’s skill level in working with persons from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds. Prereq: EDP 600 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
 

EPE 555: Comparative Education
Analytic and comparative study of contemporary education in selected countries, with emphasis on the historical development and total cultural context of educational programs in non-Western countries. Informal as well as formal agencies and programs will be studied with particular attention to recent reforms and innovations. Prereq: Junior, senior or graduate status, or consent of instructor.
 

EPE 602: Social Policy Issues in Education
Study of philosophical, historical, and sociological dimensions of contemporary educational policy issues. Topical policy controversies, such as equality of educational opportunity, tuition tax credits, and religious education, will be examined.
 

EPE 670: Policy Issues in Higher Education
A survey of modern tendencies in higher education; scope and development, objectives, organization, administration, curricula, finance, faculty and student personnel. Designed primarily for prospective college administrators, teachers, and registrars.
 

EPE 678: Economics of Higher Education
This course addresses issues of equity and efficiency by analyzing 1) how students, faculty and institutions are influenced by markets and incentives, 2) the economic impact of higher education on students and society, and 3) the financial management of institutions.
 

EPE 797: Historical Research on Education
Advanced historical research and writing on issues in the study of education taught in Distance Learning (DL) asynchronous format.
 

EPE 798: Diversity in Higher Education
A critical study of selected problems in higher education. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits but no more than three credits may be earned under the same subtitle. Prereq: Consent of instructor.
 

Quantitative and Psychometric Methods (QPM) Core

Program Notes:

  • 18 additional hours of QPM courses are required beyond the Common Research Methods and Statistics Core
  • Students need to specify primary emphasis as either quantitative methods or psychometric methods
  • Courses may be substituted based on the approval of the advisory committee

Primary Emphasis

Group A: Quantitative Methods (at least 12 hours for primary emphasis)

EDP/EPE 660: Research Design and Analysis in Education
This is a statistics-oriented course that focuses on various aspects of regression analysis (general and generalized linear models). Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, simple correlation and regression, multiple regression (with and without interaction/moderation terms, with/without nonlinear terms, contrast variable coding for categorical predictors, nested model comparison for hierarchical regression, etc.), regression diagnostics (outlying and influential cases identification and assessment, collinearity evaluation, residual analysis, etc.), logistic regression (with a comparison of the logit model with other commonly used classification models like probit model, decision tree model, etc.), among other things. The course will familiarize students with cleaning data for regression analysis, building regression models, conducting statistical inference of regression models, selecting the optimal regression model(s) for the data in hand, and interpreting regression analysis results using the right language. Students will gain requisite foundation knowledge necessary to learn more complex statistical tests and procedures, and become more critical of statistical presentations in academic journals and the mass media. Students will also become proficient in using at least one major statistics computer program (SPSS, Minitab, SAS, Stata, or R). Prereq: EPE/EDP 558 or consent of instructor.
 

EDP/EPE 707: Multivariate Analysis in Educational Research
Multivariate statistics will prepare student to understand multivariate statistical methods and draw the link between statistics previously learned. Students will be able to conduct, interpret, and critique procedures such as factorial ANOVA, multiple regression, MANOVA, ANCOVA, MANCOVA, PCA, EFA, discriminant function analysis, logistic regression, canonical correlation, hierarchal linear regression, and multivariate analysis of change. Become familiar with statistical software for implementing multivariate procedures. Develop an understanding of the concepts, terms, and symbols used in multivariate statistics (e.g., Matrix Algebra, effect sizes). Gain an appreciation of the role of multivariate procedures in the research process. Gain requisite knowledge necessary to learn more complex statistical procedures. Prereq: EDP/EPE 660 or equivalent.
 

EDP/EPE 711: Advanced Quantitative Methods (can be repeated up to 12 hours with a minimum 6 hours)
This course is intended to familiarize students with advanced quantitative techniques. Topics include structural equation modelling, item response theory, rasch modelling, hierarchical linear modelling, and data mining. Other specific analysis techniques may also be explored. Prereq: Intermediate Statistics.
 

EDP 778 or EPE 773: Seminar (appropriate to Quantitative Methods) (can be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours)
Intensive study of selected topics in human learning and development. Particular emphasis on research topics. Students will design sample studies in their areas of interest. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under different subtitles. Prereq: Doctoral standing in the College of Education or consent of instructor.
 

EDP 782 or EPE 785: Independent Study (can be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours)
Independent study course for advanced graduate students who desire to investigate special problems and conduct research in educational psychology. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: One year of graduate work in educational psychology and consent of instructor.
 

EDP 708 or EPE 790: Internship
Full-time practice in an operational setting such as a school or government agency, with on-site supervision provided by the host agency and with academic supervision provided by a University faculty member. Practicum: full-time field experience. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: Completion of a minimum of one year of graduate study in the department and consent of instructor
 

Group B: Psychometric Methods (at least 12 hours for primary emphasis)

EDP/EPE/EDC 522: Psychological & Educational Tests & Measurement
Problems of measurement with emphasis on standardized tests. General principles of test construction and evaluation, for standardized assessments and/or teacher-made tests, examinations, criteria for evaluation and marking and other rating systems.
 

EDP/EPE 679: Introduction to Measurement Theory & Techniques
This is a measurement-oriented course that focuses on introducing measurement theory and techniques used in education and evaluation. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, measurement models, bivariate measures of association, norms, standardized score scales, scaling, reliability, validity, item analysis, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, test construction for affective and cognitive instruments, Item Response Theory, and Rasch. The course aims to familiarize students with measurement terminology, possess a detailed strategy for constructing an instrument suitable for research purposes, become familiar with statistical procedures and software for implementing measurement techniques, gain requisite foundation of knowledge necessary to learn more complex measurement models, and become more critical of measurement presentations in academic journals and the mass media.
 

EDP/EPE 712: Advanced Psychometric Methods (can be repeated up to 12 hours with a minimum 6 hours)
This course will provide students with an overview of the theory and applications of advanced psychometric methods. A psychometric method focuses on advanced psychometric methodologies used in methodologically- oriented studies in educational measurement and evaluation techniques. The goal of this course is to prepare students to analyze data using advanced psychometric methods. It covers topics in the areas of Rasch Modeling, Item Response Theory, Structural Equation Modeling, Advanced Survey Techniques, and Latent Variable Modeling (as well as additional techniques). Given the advanced nature of the course, we will not shy away from using the mathematical tools needed to develop the conceptual understanding. But the emphasis of the course will be on the conceptual understanding and application of the tools rather than on the math or the mechanics behind the tools.
 

EPE 773/EDP 778: Seminar (appropriate to Psychometric Methods) (can be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours)
Examination of selected problems in educational policy studies and evaluation or intensive study of selected topics in human learning and development. Particular emphasis on research topics. Students will design sample studies in their areas of interest. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under different subtitles.
 

EDP 782/EPE 785: Independent Study (can be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours)
Independent study course for advanced graduate students who desire to investigate special problems and conduct research in educational psychology and educational policy studies and evaluation.
 

EDP 708/EPE 790: Internship
Full-time practice in an operational setting such as a school or government agency, with on-site supervision provided by the host agency and with academic supervision provided by a University faculty member. Practicum: full-time field experience. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: Completion of a minimum of one year of graduate study in the department and consent of instructor
 

Qualifying Examination and Dissertation Research

EDP/EPE 767: Dissertation Residency Credit
Residency credit for dissertation research after the qualifying examination. Students may register for this course in the semester of the qualifying examination. A minimum of two semesters are required as well as continuous enrollment (Fall and Spring) until the dissertation is completed and defended.