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Meet UK College of Education Faculty Tackling Issues Impacting Health and Learning

The University of Kentucky College of Education is home to dozens of faculty members who conduct cutting-edge, transformative research and facilitate the translation of that research into practice. UK College of Education students, faculty, staff, and alumni work together to address significant education and health-related issues in the Commonwealth and nationally.

Each semester, the college highlights a selection of research projects that are in progress among faculty members. 

photo of Lance BollingerObesity alters muscle recruitment and joint kinematics during gait.  However, it is unclear whether these changes are due to excess body weight itself or differences in limb volume.

Dr. Lance Bollinger, a faculty member in the UK College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, is currently using wireless electromyography, inertial measurement units,and electrogonio meters to examine muscle activity and joint kinematics of obese women walking on a positive-pressure treadmill.

By increasing air pressure about the lower body to counteract the effects of gravity, his research team is studying the effects of weight loss without affecting limb volume while walking.

This innovative methodology will help reveal the role of body weight on muscle recruitment and joint kinematics in obesity.  

The Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion offers opportunities to study alongside researchers like Bollinger with bachelors, master’s, and doctoral degrees in a variety of health-related areas.

photo of Ickes
Dr. Melinda Ickes

Dr. Melinda Ickes, associate professor of health promotion in the UK College of Education Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, trains youth in Appalachia as advocates to promote tobacco control policies in Kentucky. 

Kentucky communities suffer disproportionately from tobacco-related diseases such as lung cancer. Training youth to become advocates is an effective strategy to improve health equity.

Trainings provided information on tobacco use, consequences, industry tactics, evidence-based tobacco control and advocacy skills. 

Post-training, more students supported tobacco policies and realized policies are an effective strategy to reduce tobacco use. And, the students reported greater interpersonal confidence talking with others about tobacco-related issues, as well as greater advocacy self-efficacy. In an area known for a challenging political landscape, these youth in Appalachia demonstrate desire to influence tobacco use and policy to improve their communities.  

The Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotionoffers opportunities to study alongside researchers like Ickes with bachelors, master’s, and doctoral degrees in a variety of health-related areas.

Bottge Profile PhotoDr. Brian Bottge is known for his research in teaching math to struggling students — and for helping teachers put the findings into action. 

Over the past 20 years, the Institute of Education Sciences (the research and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education), has awarded Bottge three four-year research grantsthat total nearly $5 million.

His development of the teaching method called Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI) has helped bridge the gap between university-level research and practice, bringing math to life for thousands of students. Recently. IES selected EAI as one of four math interventions eligible for replication in the upcoming IES grant competition. 

This work is featured on the Council for Exceptional Children and IES websites. 

The Department of Early Childhood, Special Education, and Rehabilitation Counselingoffers opportunities to study alongside researchers like Bottge with bachelors, master’s, and doctoral degrees in a variety of areas.