Healing Racial Trauma

Candice Hargons, Ph.D., and the RISE^2 Research Team are investigating the psychophysiological effect of racism on Black students and determining whether meditation can reduce the effect. In a mixed method experimental pilot study, they use biofeedback to observe participants’ heart rate and heart rate variability during the experiment. Then, they … Read More

Politics and Justice Implications

Amanda U. Potterton, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership Studies. Her research and teaching interests include the politics of school choice, charter schools, privatization and public education, and justice-related policy implications for students living in poverty, students with special education needs, and students who are … Read More

Research Collaboration Focuses on Painful Hip Condition

University of Kentucky researchers are in search of answers for those who suffer from a painful hip condition known as Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome (FAIS). Although the condition can be experienced at any age, it often impacts the young and athletic, bringing their active lifestyles to a halt. Patients are impacted … Read More

Gait Training in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

This study investigates the effectiveness of anti-gravity treadmill gait training on neuromuscular function, dynamic balance and gait in the population with Multiple Sclerosis. Fan Gao, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, is conducting research with two undergraduates, Erick Honaker and Trace Lindquist. Participants receive … Read More

Researching Self-Instructional Behaviors for People with Autism and Intellectual Disability

Dr. Sally Shepley is an assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education, and Rehabilitation Counseling. Her research evaluates ways to increase self-instructional behaviors for individuals with autism and intellectual disability. Self-instruction occurs when individuals use smart phones, tablets, or computers to find answers to current problems or questions, … Read More

High-Leverage and Evidenced-Based Practices in Collaborative Settings

Kera Ackerman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education, and Rehabilitation Counseling, studies teachers’ use of high-leverage and evidenced-based practices in collaborative settings and the impact these strategies have on student achievement and behavior. She is currently collaborating with doctoral student Mark Samudre and master’s students … Read More

Measuring Confidence in Teaching: Lessons from One University Health Course

Elizabeth Whitney, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, teaches a health course for elementary education majors in the College of Education. The purpose of this course is to prepare pre-service teachers to recognize and respond to a wide-range of health risk behaviors confronting children. Because … Read More

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