Faculty - SPED

 
 

Special Education: Faculty and Instructors


 

Abner, Gerald
Allday, R. Allan
Ault, Melinda
Bausch, Margaret
Bottge, Brian
Collins, Belva
Flanagan, Sara
Kleinert, Harold
Lee, Donna Brostek
McKenzie, Robert
Spriggs, Amy

photo of the Taylor Education Building

Taylor Education Building


photo of Gerald AbnerGerald Abner, Ed. S.
Clinical Instructor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Gerald Abner is a clinical instructor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. He has 25 years experience in the public school system as a Teacher of the Visually Impaired (TVI).  Gerald received his undergraduate degree in Art Education from the University of Kentucky (UK), a Masters in Visual Impairments from the University of Louisville, and an Education Specialist degree in Assistive Technology from UK.

Gerald has taught assistive technology classes at the university level and currently conducts professional development trainings at the local, state and national level. Combining his interest of assistive technology and visual impairments, his current focus is working with the University to create a new certification program for teachers of the visually impaired.

In 2004, Gerald was named Special Educator of the year from the Kentucky State Department of Education. Together with a colleague, Gerald has created and trademarked “Buckets of Literacy” which is an innovative way to create literacy experiences for inclusive classrooms using a variety of both instructional and assistive technologies. Following the Universal Design for Learning framework the Buckets allow teachers to create a print rich environment for all learners regardless of disability.

Gerald also serves on a team of educators from Jessamine County Schools that travels to Hong Kong as part of the International Alliance for Invitational Education. This team spends time teaching in primary schools in Hong Kong and will return there in the fall of 2012 to provide professional development and model teaching evident of Invitational Education practices.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Allan Allday

R. Allan Allday, Ph. D.
Assistant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

R. Allan Allday is an Assistant Professor of Special Education in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Prior to completing his Ph.D. at Auburn University in 2004, Dr. Allday served as a special education teacher to students with emotional/behavioral disorders and as a behavioral consultant. He is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst – Doctoral (BCBA-D). Dr. Allday served in 2008 and 2010 as a Fulbright Scholar to Ukraine, where he provided instruction and consultation to universities, schools, and rehabilitation centers on how to work with children with behavior challenges and Autism. Dr. Allday maintains his work in Ukraine through providing staff training and intervention for children and youth with various disabilities in rehabilitation centers and orphanages that are exhibiting challenging and self-injurious behaviors.

Dr. Allday’s research focuses on how teacher behavior affects student behavior. His focus is on finding simple changes to teacher behavior that improves student outcomes. Dr. Allday has taught courses related to classroom and behavior management, characteristics of emotional/behavioral disorders, single subject research, applied behavior analysis, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and instructional methods for mild/moderate disabilities. Dr. Allday has served as President of the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders in South Carolina. He currently serves on the Editorial Board of Journal of Disability Policy Studies and has been a reviewer for Education and Treatment of Children, Behavioral Disorders, Journal of Educational Psychology, NASSP Bulletin, and Family Relations.

:: top ::


Melinda J. Ault, Ph. D.photo of Dr. Melinda Ault
Assistant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita
(at prompt, select 'Read Only')

Melinda Jones Ault is an assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Before coming to the university, Dr. Ault taught students with moderate and severe disabilities in rural Kentucky for 4 years. Dr. Ault served for many years as a research associate at the University of Kentucky, working on federally-funded research projects related to systematic instruction of students with moderate to severe disabilities, single subject research design, and early childhood special education. Most recently she served as the Project Director for the National Assistive Technology Research Institute, a federally funded project designed to examine factors related to the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of assistive technology services in schools.

Dr. Ault has co-authored a book related to systematic instruction for students with moderate to severe disabilities, an environmental assessment instrument for early childhood K-3 classrooms, a computer program for single subject research design, an instructional material for the implementation of assistive technology in schools, and over 35 journal articles related to her work. She regularly presents at national and international professional conferences.

Dr. Ault received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Elementary Education and Special Education and a Masters degree in Special Education from the University of Kentucky. She received her Doctorate in Special Education from the University of Kentucky in 2010.

Her current research interests are in systematic instruction, communication, and technology applications for students with significant disabilities, and inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in their faith communities.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Margaret BauschMargaret E.  Bausch, Ed. D.
Assistant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Margaret E. Bausch, Ed. D. is an associate professor in the University of Kentucky’s Assistive Technology (AT) Program and Director of the AT Certificate. She is co-chair of the Publications committee for the Technology and Media Division of CEC. She has authored publications in refereed journals and is the co-editor of the recently released book, Apps for All students: A Teacher’s Desktop Guide. She has 48 peer-reviewed and keynote presentations at national and international conferences. Dr. Bausch currently teaches courses in AT, AT Assessment, and Coordinating AT Programs.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Brian Bottge
Brian Bottge
Professor, Endowed Chair

:: Contact
:: Vita
:: Research Website

Dr. Brian Bottge is the William T. Bryan Endowed Chair in Special Education in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Prior to his appointment at UK, he was Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he was given Emeritus status.

Dr. Bottge is best known for Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI), which is a strategy for teaching math to low-performing adolescents. EAI provides rich and engaging contexts (i.e., computer and hands-on applications) where students develop their computation and problem-solving skills. Dr. Bottge’s work has been supported by grants from the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Educational Practice, the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) (Cognition and Student Learning). Dr. Bottge’s research is highlighted in the U. S. Department of Education “Doing What Works” website and has been reported in various education and technology publications.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Belva CollinsBelva Collins
Professor, Department Chair

:: Contact
:: Vita

A former rural special education teacher, Dr. Collins earned a master’s degree from the University of Virginia and a doctoral degree from the University of Kentucky with a focus in Severe Disabilities. She has been on faculty in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling since 1990. Dr. Collins helped develop the department’s distance education program in Moderate and Severe Disabilities with the support of numerous federal grants to prepare special education personnel in rural Kentucky. She also was instrumental in developing UK’s graduate certificate in Distance Education and has been successful in securing several federal grants to prepare future faculty with skills in distance education delivery.

Her present research interests are in three primary areas: (a) systematic instruction of functional core content with students with moderate and severe disabilities, (b) distance education to prepare rural special education personnel, and (c) inclusion of persons with special needs in their faith communities.

Dr. Collins is a past chair of the American Council on Rural Special Education (ACRES) and currently serves as editor of the organization’s refereed journal, Rural Special Education Quarterly. She is the author of Moderate and Severe Disabilities: A Foundational Approach and Systematic Instruction for Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities, as well as over 90 book chapters or publications in refereed journals. In addition, she regularly presents her research at a international and national professional conferences.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Sara Flanagan
Sara Flanagan
Assisstant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Dr. Sara Flanagan is an assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. She received her doctorate in special education from Purdue University in 2012 and a Master of Science in Education in educational technology in 2008. At Purdue University, she served as a research assistant on a variety of studies, ranging from developing a calculator for students with visual impairments to examining the effectiveness of “smartpen” technologies. Dr. Flanagan has coauthored publications relating to her research, and presented at conferences at the national and state levels.

Dr. Flanagan's research focuses on supporting secondary students across content areas with a specific focus on written expression. She explores the effectiveness of and classroom usability of procedural facilitators and technology-based supports for written expression for students with and without learning disabilities.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Harold Kleinert
Harold Kleinert
Adjunct Associate Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Dr. Harold Kleinert is the executive director of the Human Development Institute-University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service at the University of Kentucky. He has directed a broad range of federally funded demonstration and research projects, including the KY Alternate Portfolio Study, the Paraprofessional Training Component for Kentucky's State Improvement Grant, the KY Systems Change Project for Students with Severe Disabilities, the Personal Futures Planning Project for Individuals with Deaf-Blindness, and the KY Peer Service Learning Project.

Dr. Kleinert co-directed the development of KY's alternate assessment (resulting in the first fully inclusive educational assessment system in the nation), and is nationally recognized for his research on alternate educational assessments. He has published widely in the area of alternate assessment for students with significant disabilities under IDEA, including research on the impact of the inclusion of students with significant disabilities in large-scale assessment and accountability systems, and is the lead author of the text Alternate Assessment: Measuring Outcomes and Supports for Students with Disabilities.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Donna Brostek LeeDonna Brostek Lee
Clinical Assistant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita (PDF)

Donna Brostek Lee is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Prior to starting at UK, Dr. Lee was an assistant professor and the co-coordinator of the Teaching Children with Visual Impairments and Orientation & Mobility with Children programs at Western Michigan University.   Her specialty is working with children who are blind and visually impaired and she has been charged with the task of starting the new program to train Teachers of the Visually Impaired here at UK. Classes are expected to start in the fall of 2013.

Dr. Lee is very active in the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AER) and is currently the chair for the Personnel Preparation Division. She also has been a co-director of the Michigan Sports Education Camp for Youths with Visual Impairments for the past three years. Her research interests include sleep problems in young children who are blind and electronic travel aids for the blind. Most recently, Dr. Lee helped to develop an iOS app (iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch) called ViA with the Braille Institute of America and the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). Dr. Lee provides training across the country on the use of iOS devices with the blind and visually impaired. 

Dr. Lee received her doctorate from the University of Louisville and was honored to be a National Leadership in Visual Impairment (NCLVI) fellow during her doctoral program. Her master’s degree was in Orientation & Mobility and her bachelor’s degree in teaching was in elementary education and visual impairment. Both degrees were from Western Michigan University.

:: top ::


photo of Dr. Robert McKenzie

Robert McKenzie
Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Prior to receiving his doctorate at the University of Iowa in 1981, Dr. McKenzie served as a public school secondary social studies teacher and special education resource teacher.  Since arriving at the University of Kentucky in 2002, he has been a member of the Learning & Behavior Disorders program faculty and served as that program’s Faculty Chair from 2004 - 2008.  Dr. McKenzie’s area of instructional expertise is the assessment of learning and other mild disabilities, and his current research focuses on improving the quality of collaborative, co-teaching models of instruction and issues related to response-to-intervention models.

 :: top ::


Photo of Dr. Amy Spriggs
Amy Spriggs

Assistant Professor

:: Contact
:: Vita

Dr. Amy Spriggs is an assistant professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling. Dr. Spriggs received her Bachelor of Science, Master of Education and Doctorate Degrees in Special Education at the University of Georgia. Dr. Spriggs taught in public schools while pursuing her degrees and has over ten years of experience working with students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and students with moderate/severe disabilities. Dr. Spriggs secured grant monies to be used in her classrooms. Dr. Spriggs focused her research on student needs to include practical systematic instruction implementation in the classroom, strategies to increase independence, access to recreation and leisure activities, and video modeling. Dr. Spriggs has authored book chapters and publications pertaining to these topics, and has presented her research at state and national conferences.

Dr. Spriggs is currently the Program Faculty Chair for the Moderate and Severe Disabilities (MSD) program. She advises all undergraduates and teaches both undergraduate and graduate methods and practicum courses in the MSD program.

Dr. Spriggs’ research interests include practical systematic instructional strategies for individuals with ASD and moderate/severe disabilities, increased independence, evidence-based practices, and technology.

:: top ::

 EDSRC Home